The Pill

“The Pill” is a pill. (How’s that for stating the obvious?) Some people call it “oral contraception.” You take it once a day, at the same time every day. There are lots of different kinds of pills on the market, and new ones come out all the time. They all work by releasing hormones that keep your ovaries from releasing eggs. The hormones also thicken your cervical mucus, which helps to block sperm from getting to the egg in the first place. 

COMBINATION

These use an estrogen/progestin combo that works with your body to prevent ovulation. A monthly combination pill pack contains 3 consecutive weeks of hormone-based pills and a week of placebos that’ll bring on your period.

PROGESTIN-ONLY

Better known as the mini-pill, these have no estrogen in them and are often prescribed if you’re sensitive to combination pills and having side effects. These release a small amount of progestin everyday of the month and don’t give you a period during a set week.

Real Stories


These videos will give you a sense of some people's personal experiences using this method. They are not meant to be understood as medical facts, and your experience may differ.

Building Healthy Futures:

The Campaign to Prevent Unintended Pregnancy in New York City sponsored by Planned Parenthood of New York City and partners

FOUNDING PARTNERS: Bronx District Public Health Office, NYC Dept of Health & Mental Hygiene • The Bronx Health Link • Hostos Community College • Montefiore Medical Center • Planned Parenthood® of New York City • The Women’s Housing and Economic Development Corporation (WHEDco)

Thanks to our friends at Bedsider.org and Beforeplay.org for sharing information and tools in this website